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Europe has so many unique languages so here is a guide on how to say I love you in different European languages! #valentines #linguistics

Valentine’s Day is fast approaching and it’s one of my hobbies to not say ‘I love you’ to my boyfriend. Not to just never say it (that would be a bit odd), but rather to say it in a different language. It’s become almost a ritual where he says ‘I love you’, I respond with ‘I love you’ in another language and he asks ‘what’s this one?’ As a massive language nerd, it’s pretty fun.

So you can learn how to say I love you in every European language, I’ve created this blog post of translations and fun language facts. Read on to find out how to say I love you in different languages!

How to say I love you in 50 languages

Every European country is included in this list, including some that are technically ‘Eurasia’ or are geographically Asia but politically Europe. I have also included some overseas territories (such as Gibraltar) due to their unique language.

You will find out how to say I love you in European languages, in particular in every official language of each European country, as well as some minority languages. You will find the countries listed in alphabetical order, just in case you’re looking for one country in particular!

Looking for a more concise post with just a list of languages and translations? Find my translations list article here!

 

Albania

The official language of Albania is Albanian. Albanian in Albania has two main dialects, Gheg in the north and Tosk in the south. 98.77% of the population of Albania considers Albanian to be their mother tongue. Minority languages within Albania include Greek (around 2-3% of the population), Aromanian (an eastern Romance language related to Romanian, Aromanians make up around 2-3% of the population) and Macedonian (less than 0.2%).

How do you say I love you in Albanian? 

I love you in Albanian: Të dua

How to say I love you in Albanian

How do you say I love you in Albania’s minority languages?

I love you in Aromanian: Ti voi

I love you in Greek: S’agapo (Σ΄αγαπώ)

I love you in Macedonian: Te sakam (Те сакам)

 

Andorra

Andorra’s official language is Catalan and is the only country in the world to have Catalan as the only official language. Andorra doesn’t have any minority languages although immigration from countries such as Spain, France and Portugal has somewhat increased the number of speakers of Spanish, French, Portuguese and Galician. Andorra’s school system offers education both in Catalan and French.

The government of Andorra is enforcing the learning of Catalan and the use of the language within the immigrant labour force.

I love you in Catalan: T’estimo

How to say I love you in Catalan

Armenia

The Caucasian country of Armenia is located between Eastern Europe and Western Asia but is generally considered to be culturally European. The only official language of Armenia is Armenian, a language which uses a unique 36-letter alphabet that was introduced in 405 AD by Armenian linguist Mesrop Mashtots.

Armenia does have a few officially recognised minority languages, including Kurmanji or Northern Kurdish (spoken by the Yazidi minority and the native language of 1% of Armenia’s population), Russian (spoken by 1% of Armenia’s population, of whom around 13,000 are ethnic Russians), Assyrian Neo-Aramaic (an Aramaic language spoken natively by 0.8% of the population), Ukrainian (0.02%) and Greek (0.04%).

How do you say I love you in Armenian? 

I love you in Armenian: Sirum Em Qez (Սիրում եմ Քեզ)

 

How do you say I love you in Armenia’s minority languages?

I love you in Kurmanji/Kurdish: Ez te hez dikèm (general), Dilê min ketiye te (romantic)

I love you in Russian: Ya tebya lyublyu (Я тебя люблю)

I love you in Assyrian: Ana Bayyinakh (to a woman), Ana bayanoukh (to a man)

I love you in Ukranian: Ya tebe kochayu (Я тебе кохаю)

I love you in Greek: S’agapo (Σ΄αγαπώ)

 

Austria

Austria’s official language is German, in particular the Austro-Bavarian dialect. The province of Vorarlberg uses the Alemannic dialect, the same dialect of German that is Swiss German. Minority languages in Austria include Turkish (2.3% of the population) and Serbian (2.2%) as well as minority languages that are official languages in certain provinces. Croatian and Romani are official minority languages in Burgenland, Hungarian in Burgenland and Vienna, Slovene in Carinthia and Styria, and Czech and Slovak in Vienna.

How do you say I love you in Austria? 

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

I love you in Austrian German: I lieb di (the same as ‘ich liebe dich’ but in an Austro-Bavarian dialect), I mog di, I hob di gern

 

How do you say I love you in Austria’s minority languages?

I love you in Turkish: Seni seviyorum

I love you in Serbian: Volim te (Волим те)

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Croatian: Volim te

I love you in Hungarian: Szeretlek (pronounced ‘seh-ret-lek’)

I love you in Slovene: Ljubim te

I love you in Czech: Miluju tě

I love you in Slovak: Milujem ťa

 

Azerbaijan

Azerbaijani (also called Azeri) is the official language of Azerbaijan. Azeri is a Turkic language that is closely related to modern Turkish. Azerbaijan is home to many minority languages, of which the majority are endangered languages which means that they are spoken by fewer than 10,000 people. The minority languages are Lezgian, Talysh, Avar, and Georgian (these four are not endangered) as well as the endangered languages of Budukh, Juhuri, Khinalug, Kryts, Jek, Rutul, Tsakhur, Tat, and Udi.

How do you say I love you in Azeri? 

I love you in Azeri: Mən səni sevirəm (pronounced ‘man sah-NEE seh-vih-RAM’)

How to say I love you in Azeri

How do you say I love you in Azerbaijan’s minority languages?

I love you in Lezgian: Zaz vun gzaf k’anda (Заз вун гзаф кIанда)

I love you in Georgian: Me shen miq’varkhar (მე შენ მიყვარხარ)

 

Azerbaijan’s endangered languages

Unfortunately, it’s very hard to find information on the translation of phrases into many endangered languages, as well as the minority languages of Talysh and Avar. Azerbaijan has not ratified the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages, even though it has been a signatory of it since 1992. This means that the endangered languages native to Azerbaijan and not spoken elsewhere are very likely to become extinct in the next few years or decades.

 

Belarus

Belarus has two official languages, Belarusian and Russian. 72% of the population of Belarus uses Russian at home and only 52.5% of the population can read and speak Belarusian, with 29.4% being able to write, read and speak Belarusian.

Minority languages of Belarus include Ukrainian, Eastern Yiddish and Polish. A language hybrid of Russian and Belarusian called ‘trasianka‘ is also spoken by some people, predominantly when people from rural Belarusian speaking regions moved to the cities where Russian was more commonly used.

How do you say I love you in Belarus? 

I love you in Russian: Ya tebya lyublyu (Я тебя люблю)

I love you in Belarusian: Ya tsyabie kachayu (Я цябе кахаю)

 

How do you say I love you in Belarus’ minority languages?

I love you in Polish: Kocham cię (pronounced like ‘KOHham chyem’)

I love you in Yiddish: Ikh hob dikh lib (איך האָב דיך ליב – reading right to left!)

I love you in Ukrainian: Ya tebe kochayu (Я тебе кохаю)

 

Belgium

Belgium is one of the fun countries in Europe with multiple official languages. The official languages are Dutch (the dialect being Flemish Dutch), French and German. The Dutch spoken in Belgium is slightly different from the Dutch spoken in The Netherlands and this is due to the influence of the French language use in the country – Flemish (sometimes called ‘Belgian Dutch’) will generally include loan words from French and words called ‘belgicisms‘, which also appear in Belgian French. Belgicisms are words that are unique to Belgian French and/or Belgian Dutch and don’t appear in standard Dutch or French.

German is spoken natively by less than 1% of the population but is still an official language of the country. It is spoken by around 77,000 people in the province of Liege (Lüttich) in Wallonia, an area that was ceded by the German Empire under the Treaty of Versailles after World War I.

Non-official languages of Belgium include Walloon (a Romance language), Picard (related to French), Champenois (spoken in the Champagne region of France and a small part of Wallonia), Lorrain (related to French and spoken in the region of Gaume in southeast Belgium, as well as Lorraine and Alsace in France), Limburgish (related to Dutch with Germanic influences and spoken in the Limburg regions of Belgium and The Netherlands), Luxembourgish (spoken by some in the Belgian province of Luxembourg) and Yiddish (spoken by the Ashkenazi Jewish community in Antwerp).

 

How do you say I love you in Belgium? 

I love you in Flemish (Belgian Dutch): Ik zie je graag / Ik zie u graag

I love you in French: Je t’aime

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

 

How do you say I love you in Belgium’s minority languages?

I love you in Limburgish: Ik hald van dich

I love you in Walloon: Dji t’veû vol’tî

I love you in Yiddish: Ikh hob dikh lib (איך האָב דיך ליב – reading right to left!)

I love you in Luxembourgish: Ech hunn dech gär

 

Bosnia & Herzegovina

Interesting, the constitution of Bosnia does not actually name an official language. In 2000, the languages of Bosnian, Serbian and Croatian were ruled to be of equal status in the Constitutional Court. The three languages are mutually intelligible and can be considered to be dialects of Serbo-Croatian, although those who are ethnically from one of these groups prefer them to be considered separate languages rather than dialects.

Serbian and Bosnian can be written in the Cyrillic or Latin alphabets and, in Bosnia, you will generally find Serbian to be written in Cyrillic and Bosnian to be written in the Latin alphabet. Croatian is only written in the Latin alphabet. According to the 2013 census, 52.86% of Bosnians consider their mother tongue to be Bosnian, 30.76% Serbian and 14.6% Croatian.

Seventeen national minority groups and their languages are recognised in Bosnia and make up less than 3% of the country. The minority languages are Italian, Ukranian, Albanian, Czech, German, Hungarian, Macedonian, Montenegrin, Polish, Romani, Romanian, Russian, Rusyn (Ruthenian), Slovak, Slovene and Turkish. There is also a minority of Jews in Bosnia but Yiddish is not one of the minority languages. The only minority languages used in education are Ukrainian and Italian in just two schools in Bosnia.

How do you say I love you in Bosnia? 

I love you in Bosnian: Volim te

I love you in Serbian: Volim te (Волим те)

I love you in Croatian: Volim te

 

How do you say I love you in Bosnia’s minority languages?

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

I love you in Italian: Ti amo

I love you in Ukrainian: Ya tebe kochayu (Я тебе кохаю)

I love you in Albanian: Të dua

I love you in Czech: Miluju tě

I love you in Hungarian: Szeretlek (pronounced ‘seh-ret-lek’)

I love you in Macedonian: Te sakam (Те сакам)

I love you in Montenegrin: Volim te

I love you in Polish: Kocham cię (pronounced like ‘KOHham chyem’)

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Romanian: Te iubesc

I love you in Russian: Ya tebya lyublyu (Я тебя люблю)

I love you in Rusyn: Lyublyu tya (Люблю тя)

I love you in Slovak: Milujem ťa

I love you in Slovene: Ljubim te

I love you in Turkish: Seni seviyorum

Map of Bosnia with flag of Bosnia

 

Bulgaria

Bulgaria’s official language is Bulgarian, a Slavic language that uses the Cyrillic alphabet. Bulgaria does recognise two minority languages, which are Turkish and Romani. Other minority languages that are used in Bulgaria include Russian, Ukrainian, Armenian, Tatar, Greek, Romanian, Aromanian and Megleno-Romanian.

 

How do you say I love you in Bulgarian? 

I love you in Bulgarian: Obicham te (Обичам те)

 

How do you say I love you in Bulgaria’s official minority languages?

I love you in Turkish: Seni seviyorum

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

 

Croatia

Croatian is the official language of Croatia, a Serbo-Croatian language/dialect that is mutually intelligible with Serbian, Bosnian and Montenegrin. Croatia has many minority languages, of which the largest is Serbian (spoken by 1.23% of the population) while no other minority language has more than 0.5% of the population as native speakers.

The main minority languages are Czech, Hungarian, Italian, Serbian and Slovak and these are used in some official governmental documents. Besides these languages, Albanian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, German, Hebrew, Macedonian, Montenegrin, Polish, Romanian, Romani, Russian, Rusyn, Slovenian, Turkish and Ukrainian are also recognised as minority languages.

How do you say I love you in Croatian? 

I love you in Croatian: Volim te

 

How do you say I love you in Croatia’s main minority languages?

I love you in Czech: Miluju tě

I love you in Hungarian: Szeretlek (pronounced ‘seh-ret-lek’)

I love you in Italian: Ti amo

I love you in Serbian: Volim te (Волим те)

I love you in Slovak: Milujem ťa

 

Cyprus

Cyprus has two official languages, which are Greek and Turkish. The vernacular forms are called Cypriot Greek and Cypriot Turkish and can differ slightly from standard Greek and Turkish (similar to how Austrian and Swiss German differ from German).

There are two recognised minority languages in Cyprus and one unrecognised. These belong to three recognised religious minority groups. The two recognised languages are Armenian and Cypriot Arabic (Cypriot Arabic is written in the Greek alphabet) and the unrecognised language is Kurbetcha, a creole of Romani and Cypriot Turkish spoken by the Kurbet (Cypriot Roma).

How do you say I love you in Cyprus? 

I love you in Cypriot Greek: Se aghapo (Σ’αγαπάω)

I love you in Turkish: Seni Seviyorum

 

How do you say I love you in Cyprus’ minority languages?

I love you in Armenian: Sirum Em Qez (Սիրում եմ Քեզ)

I love you in Cypriot Arabic: Uḥibbuk (Υχιβυκ)

Czech Republic

When you’re in the Czech Republic (also known as Czechia), you’ll find that the only official language is Czech. If you want to learn how to say I love you in the Czech Republic, then this will be the main language you will need! The Czech Republic does have official minority languages as well and these are (in alphabetical order) Belarusian, Bulgarian, Croatian, German, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Romani, Russian, Rusyn, Serbian, Slovak, Ukrainian, and Vietnamese.

How do you say I love you in Czechia? 

I love you in Czech: Miluju tě

Map of Czech Republic with flag of Czechia

How do you say I love you in the Czech Republic’s minority languages?

I love you in Belarusian: Ya tsyabie kachayu (Я цябе кахаю)

I love you in Bulgarian: Obicham te (Обичам те)

I love you in Croatian: Volim te

I love you in Greek: S’agapo (Σ΄αγαπώ)

I love you in Hungarian: Szeretlek (pronounced ‘seh-ret-lek’)

I love you in Polish: Kocham cię (pronounced like ‘KOHham chyem’)

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Russian: Ya tebya lyublyu (Я тебя люблю)

I love you in Rusyn: Lyublyu tya (Люблю тя)

I love you in Serbian: Volim te (Волим те)

I love you in Slovak: Milujem ťa

I love you in Ukrainian: Ya tebe kochayu (Я тебе кохаю)

I love you in Vietnamese: Tôi yêu bạn

 

Denmark

The only official language of Denmark is Danish. There are three minority languages which are Faroese, Greenlandic and German. Only German is a minority language that is used for education in mainland Denmark.

How do you say I love you in Denmark? 

I love you in Danish: Jeg elsker dig

How to say I love you in Danish

How do you say I love you in Denmark’s minority language?

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

 

Estonia

Estonia’s official language is Estonian, one of the few languages spoken in European countries that is not a part of the Indo-European language family. Instead, Estonian is a Uralic language and is related to Finnish and Hungarian. The main regional minority language (previously considered a dialect but now considered to be an indigenous language in itself) is Võro, which has a subdialect called Setu. Minority languages in Estonia are Russian, German and Swedish, although the German and Swedish communities mostly fled Estonia during World War II.

How do you say I love you in Estonia? 

I love you in Estonian: Ma armastan sind

How to say I love you in Estonian

How do you say I love you in Estonia’s minority languages?

I love you in Russian: Ya tebya lyublyu (Я тебя люблю)

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

I love you in Swedish: Jag älskar dig

 

Faroe Islands *

While not an independent country, I chose to include the Faroe Islands (and territories such as Greenland and Gibraltar below) due to the difference in the language spoken from the country they belong to. The Faroe Islands is a North Atlantic archipelago that is an autonomous territory in the Kingdom of Denmark.

Faroese is the official language of the Faroe Islands, although Danish is taught in all schools and can be used in government in addition to Faroese. Danish is not considered an official language of the Faroe Islands, but rather the first foreign language. The closest living relative of Faroese is Icelandic, particularly in written form, although spoken Faroese is closer to some of the dialects of Western Norway.

How do you say I love you in Faroese? 

I love you in Faroese: Eg elski teg

How to say I love you in Faroese

 

Finland

The two official languages in Finland are Finnish (first language for 87.6% of people) and Swedish (first language for 5.2% of people, including more than 92% of the population of the Åland Islands). There are also quite a few recognised minority languages, including Sami (three variants), Romani and Karelian (a people who emigrated to Finland after the Second World War from the Border-Karelian region of Russia).

The Sámi languages spoken in Finland are Northern Sami (the main language that is spoken by around 75% of Sámi speakers), Inari Sami (spoken only in the Inari region of Finland) and Skolt Sami, also known as Eastern Sami, which is spoken in the Inari region of Finland and small Sami settlements of the Murmansk Oblast in Russia. Inari Sami only has approximately 500 speakers while Skolt Sami has slightly less with around 400 speakers and are therefore both considered seriously endangered languages.

How do you say I love you in Finland? 

I love you in Finnish: Minä rakastan sinua

I love you in Swedish: Jag älskar dig

 

How do you say I love you in Finland’s minority languages?

I love you in Northern Sami: Mun ráhkistan du

I love you in Skolt Sami: Mon rääʹǩǩstam tuu

I love you in Inari Sami: Mun rähistâm tuu

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Karelian: Minä armastan sindai

 

France

French is the only official language of France according to the French constitution. No minority languages are officially recognised but there are ‘regional languages’ (often referred to in a derogatory way as ‘patois’), some of which existed before French itself.

The regional languages of France include the Celtic Breton language, the Germanic languages of Alsatian, French Flemish and Lorraine Franconian, the Italo-Dalmation language of Corsican, the Gallo-Romance languages of Langues d’oïl (a group of languages/dialects including Champenois, Gallo, Lorrain, Norman, Picard, Poitevin, Saintongeais, Walloon and Angevin), Occitan (as well as Provençal, a variety of Occitan), Catalan, Franco-Provençal and Ligurian. The final regional language of France (PHEW, that was a long list) is Basque, a language isolate spoken in parts of southwestern France and northern Spain.

How do you say I love you in France? 

I love you in French: Je t’aime

 

How do you say I love you in France’s regional languages?

I love you in Breton: C’hwant m’eus diouzhit (pronounced ‘c’hwan m’eus diwit’)

I love you in Alsatian: Ich hàbb dir lïab

I love you in Corsican: Ti tengu caru

I love you in Walloon: Dji t’veû vol’tî

I love you in Occitan: T’aimi

I love you in Catalan: T’estimo

I love you in Ligurian: Te véuggio bén

I love you in Basque: Maite zaitut

How to say I love you in Basque

 

Georgia

The official language of Georgia, a beautiful country in the Caucasus region (see my favourite places to visit in Tbilisi here!), is Georgian. The other official language is Abkhaz, but this language only has official status in the autonomous region of Abkhazia. Georgian is part of the Kartvelian language family, which also includes the languages of Svan (with approximately 35,000–40,000 native speakers mainly located in the northern region of Svaneti as well as in Abkhazia), Mingrelian (with around 500,000 native speakers mainly in the Samegrelo region of Western Georgia as well as the Gali district of Abkhazia) and Laz (around 2,000 native speakers who can be found in the southwestern Adjara region).

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How do you say I love you in Georgian? 

I love you in Georgian: Me shen miq’varkhar (მე შენ მიყვარხარ)

How to say I love you in Georgian

How do you say I love you in Georgia’s regional languages?

I love you in Abkhaz: Sapa uapa bzia uzboeet (Cара yара бзиа узбoит) to a man; Sapa bapa bzia bizboeet (Cара барa бзиа бызбoит) to a woman

I love you in Mingrelian: Gqorop/ma si gqorop (გჸოროფ/მა სი გჸოროფ)

I love you in Laz: Ma si kqorop (მა სი ქყოროფ)

 

Germany

The only official language of Germany is German, in particular ‘Standard German’ (known in German as ‘Hochdeutsch’). Recognised minority languages within Germany include Upper Sorbian, Lower Sorbian, Romani, Danish, North Frisian and Saterland Frisian. Unfortunately, some of these minority languages have very few resources as well as very few online translations so I have been unable to find translations for a few of these languages.

How do you say I love you in German? 

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

 

How do you say I love you in Germany’s minority languages?

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Danish: Jeg elsker dig

I love you in North Frisian: Ik hääw de liif

I love you in Saterland Frisian: Iek hääb die ljoo

 

Gibraltar *

Gibraltar is a British overseas territory that borders the region of Andalucía in Spain. Gibraltar has a massively interesting history and is intriguing linguistically as well. The hybrid language Llanito can be considered ‘the language of Gibraltar’, although Llanito is rarely written and is predominantly an oral language. Llanito is a hybrid (or even a creole) of British English, Spanish (in particular Andalusian Spanish), Genoese (a dialect of Ligurian), Haketia (a Judeo-Spanish language with aspects of Arabic and Hebrew), Maltese and Portuguese. Llanito can be pretty almost entirely incomprehensible for speakers of English or Spanish and still pretty tough for those who are bilingual in both Spanish and English.

Gibraltar’s only official language is English, although Spanish is widely spoken and most Gibraltarians are bilingual. Minority languages in Gibraltar include Berber, Maghrebi Arabic, Hebrew, Maltese, Hindi and Sindhi. Genoese was a minority language in Gibraltar up until it died out in the early 1900s.

How do you say I love you in Gibraltar? 

I love you in English: I love you

I love you in Llanito: Te quiero (generally speaking! An interesting related word is ‘kerio’ or ‘keria’, which comes from querido/querida, meaning darling/sweetie in Spanish)

I love you in Spanish: Te quiero

Europe has so many unique languages so here is a guide on how to say I love you in different European languages! #valentines #linguistics

How do you say I love you in Gibraltar’s minority languages?

I love you in Berber: Dakkm tirikh

I love you in Maghrebi Arabic: Tanbghik (تنبغيك)

I love you in Hebrew: Ani ohev otach (אני אוהב אותך) to a woman; Ani ohevet otcha (אני אוהבת אותך) to a man

I love you in Maltese: Inħobbok

I love you in Hindi: Main tum se pyaar karta hoon (मैं तुमसे प्यार करता हूँ।) male to female or male to male; Main tum se pyaar karti hoon (मैं तुमसे प्यार करती हूँ।) female to male or female to female

I love you in Sindhi: Maa tohsa pyaar kando ahya (مان توهان سان پيار ڪندو آھيان)

 

Greece

The only official language in Greece is Greek. There are also regional languages as well as minority languages. Regional languages include Cretan Greek, Maniot Greek (spoken along the Mani peninsula), Pontic Greek, Sarakatsanika (spoken by the ethnic Sarakatsani group of Greek Macedonia), Tsakonian Greek (used in the Tsakonia region of the Peloponnese) and Yevanic Greek (an almost extinct Jewish dialect of Greek).

Minority languages of Greek include Albanian, Arvanitika (the almost extinct language of the Arvanites, an Albanian-speaking community who settled in Greece in the late Middle Ages), Armenian, Aromanians, Megleno-Romanian, Bulgarian, Ladino (the Judeo-Spanish language traditionally spoken by Sephardic Jews in Greece, although unfortunately many were murdered in World War II and less than 10,000 remain in Greece), Romani, Russian, Turkish, Greco-Turkic/Urum, and Georgian.

How do you say I love you in Greece? 

I love you in Greek: S’agapo (Σ΄αγαπώ)

How to say I love you in Greek

How do you say I love you in Greece’s minority languages?

I love you in Albanian: Të dua

I love you in Armenian: Sirum Em Qez (Սիրում եմ Քեզ)

I love you in Aromanian: Ti voi

I love you in Bulgarian: Obicham te (Обичам те)

I love you in Ladino: Te amo (טי אמו)

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Russian: Ya tebya lyublyu (Я тебя люблю)

I love you in Turkish: Seni seviyorum

I love you in Georgian: Me shen miq’varkhar (მე შენ მიყვარხარ)

 

Greenland *

Another autonomous territory! Greenland is the world’s largest island and is an autonomous territory of the Kingdom of Denmark. Greenlandic is the national language as well as the official language of Greenland. Studying Danish and English is compulsory in school so the majority of Greenlanders are bi- or trilingual.

Greenlandic has three main dialects, these being Kalaallisut (West-Greenlandic, has 44,000 speakers and the dialect that is used as the official language), Tunumiit (East-Greenlandic with 3,000 speakers) and Inuktun (North-Greenlandic with only 800 speakers).

How do you say I love you in Greenlandic? 

I love you in Greenlandic (Kalaallisut): Asavakkit

How to say I love you in Greelandic

 

Hungary

Another Uralic language is Hungarian, the only official language of Hungary. Hungarian is geographically isolated from the other Uralic languages (Estonian, Finnish, Karelian and Sami being the main ones) and is instead surrounded mostly by Slavic languages. Hungarian is the native language of around 99% of Hungarians.

Hungary also has recognised minority languages, these being Armenian, Boyash (the language of a branch of the Romani ethnic group, predominantly consisting of an archaic dialect of Romanian with loanwords from surrounding languages), Bulgarian, Croatian, German, Greek, Polish, Romani, Romanian, Rusyn, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian and Ukrainian.

How do you say I love you in Hungarian? 

I love you in Hungarian: Szeretlek (pronounced ‘seh-ret-lek’)

How to say I love you in Hungarian

How do you say I love you in Hungary’s minority languages?

I love you in Armenian: Sirum Em Qez (Սիրում եմ Քեզ)

I love you in Bulgarian: Obicham te (Обичам те)

I love you in Croatian: Volim te

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

I love you in Greek: S’agapo (Σ΄αγαπώ)

I love you in Polish: Kocham cię (pronounced like ‘KOHham chyem’)

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Romanian: Te iubesc

I love you in Rusyn: Lyublyu tya (Люблю тя)

I love you in Serbian: Volim te (Волим те)

I love you in Slovak: Milujem ťa

I love you in Slovenian: Ljubim te

I love you in Ukrainian: Ya tebe kochayu (Я тебе кохаю)

 

 

Iceland

Iceland’s national language and the only official language is Icelandic, a North Germanic language related to Faroese and Western Norwegian. Due to Iceland’s location, the language was relatively isolated for a long time, meaning that it has been barely altered since the settlement of Iceland. This means that Icelanders can read older texts (such as the Icelandic sagas) with less difficulty than those of us speaking a language like English, who find it much harder to read the language of Shakespeare and especially Old English like in Beowulf.

The Icelandic alphabet has 32 letters and has retained two letters that English lost, these being ‘Þ/þ’ (th) and ‘Ð/ð’ (a harder, voiced th).

How do you say I love you in Icelandic? 

I love you in Icelandic: Ég elska þig (‘yeg elska thig’)

 

Ireland

Irish is the national language of Ireland but both English and Irish have equal status as official languages under the constitution. Communities that speak Irish as their first language are collectively known as the ‘Gaeltacht‘. Efforts to revive the Irish language have been minimally successful with only 1.7% of the population saying they speaking Irish daily. In the 2016 census, 70% of the population said they didn’t or couldn’t speak Irish.

How do you say I love you in Ireland? 

I love you in Irish: Gráím thú

I love you in English: I love you

 

Italy

Italy’s only official language is Italian, although there are 34 native living languages and related dialects spoken in the country. Twelve languages are recognised officially as minority languages, these being Albanian (Arbëresh), Catalan, German, Greek, Slovene, Croatian, French, Franco-Provençal, Friulian, Ladin, Occitan and Sardinian.

In some regions of Italy, a second language is co-official and has the same standing as Italian in that region. In the Aosta Valley, French is co-official with Italian and in South Tyrol, the German language is co-official with Italian.

Italy’s recognised regional languages include Emiliano-Romagnolo, Ligurian, Lombard, Piedmontese, Venetian, Neapolitan, Sicilian, Romanesco, Italiot Greek, Molise Croatian, Cimbrian, Alemannic, Gallurese, Sassarese, Walser or Walliser and Mòcheno. Romanesco has 5.7 million speakers and Sardinian has 1.6 million speakers but others such as Mòcheno, an Upper German language spoken in three towns in the Bersntol valley in Trentino, has only 1,000 speakers. Other languages you can find in Italy include Romani and Italkian (a Judeo-Italian language).

How do you say I love you in Italian? 

I love you in Italian: Ti amo

 

How do you say I love you in Italy’s regional and minority languages?

I love you in Catalan: T’estimo

I love you in Greek: S’agapo (Σ΄αγαπώ)

I love you in Slovene: Ljubim te

I love you in Croatian: Volim te

I love you in French: Je t’aime

I love you in Friulian: Ti vuei ben

I love you in Ladin: Te ei gen

I love you in Occitan: T’aimi

I love you in Sardinian: Ti chelzo ene (literally ‘I care about you’ – thank you to Claudia of My Adventures Across The World for this one!)

I love you in Sicilian: T’amu

I love you in Venetian: Te vògio ben

I love you in Emiliano-Romagnolo: A t vói bän

I love you in Cimbrian: Ich liibe-dich

How to say I love you in Sardinian

 

Kazakhstan

Kazakhstan is home to 130 ethnic groups and has two official languages with equal standing, these being Kazakh and Russian. German (958,000 speakers), Tajik, Tatar (328,000 speakers), Turkish, Ukrainian (898,000 speakers), Uyghur (300,000 speakers) and Uzbek are all recognised as minority languages and other minority languages used in the country include Kyrgyz and Nagoi.

How do you say I love you in Kazakhstan? 

I love you in Kazakh: Men seni jaqsı köremin (literally meaning ‘I see you well’) or Men seni süyemin (Мен сені сүйемін)

I love you in Russian: Ya tebya lyublyu (Я тебя люблю)

 

How do you say I love you in Kazakhstan’s minority languages?

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

I love you in Tajik: Man tuyá nághz mebenám (Ман туя нағз мебенам)

I love you in Tatar: Min sini söyäm

I love you in Turkish: Seni seviyorum

I love you in Ukrainian: Ya tebe kochayu (Я тебе кохаю)

I love you in Uyghur: Sizni yahshi kOrman (مەن سىزنى سۆيۈمەن)

I love you in Uzbek: Men seni sevaman

I love you in Kyrgyz: Men seni süyöm

 

Kosovo

The constitution of Kosovo defines Albanian and Serbian as the official languages. Kosovo is a disputed territory and partially recognised state, landlocked by Serbia, Bosnia, Macedonia and Albania. Kosovo is predominantly made up of Albanians with a Serb minority that is mainly concentrated in the north of the territory.

Turkish, Bosnian and Romani are official minority languages within Kosovo at a municipal level if the population of the municipality in question is made up of at least 5% native speakers of this language.

How do you say I love you in Kosovo? 

I love you in Albanian: Të dua

I love you in Serbian: Volim te (Волим те)

 

How do you say I love you in Kosovo’s minority languages?

I love you in Turkish: Seni seviyorum

I love you in Bosnian: Volim te

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

 

Latvia

The official language in Latvia is Latvian, an eastern Baltic language related to Lithuanian and Latgalian. Livonian is recognised as the language of the ‘indigenous population’, although the last native speaker of Livonian died in 2013, meaning that the language is actually extinct. However, the language has been somewhat revived and there are 40 people considered to be fluent in Livonian and 210 with knowledge of the language. Latgalian is recognised as a historic variant of Latvian and is still spoken by 8.8% of Latvia’s population.

All other languages are classed as ‘foreign languages’, although national minority education programmes are provided in Russian, Polish, Hebrew, Ukrainian, Estonian, Lithuanian, and Belarusian.

How do you say I love you in Latvia? 

I love you in Latvian: Es tevi mīlu

How to say I love you in Latvian

How do you say I love you in Latvia’s other recognised languages?

I love you in Latgalian: Es tevi mīļoju

 

Unfortunately due to a lack of online resources, I could not find the phrase translated into Livonian. If you know it, please let me know!

 

Liechtenstein

The official language of Liechtenstein is German, in particular two dialects called High Alemannic and Highest Alemannic (in the south of the country).

How do you say I love you in Liechtenstein? 

I love you in Alemannic German: I ha di liab

 

Lithuania

Lithuania’s official and national language is Lithuanian, a language that is considered to be the most conservative living Indo-European language, as it retains features of Proto-Indo-European (a linguistic reconstruction of the common ancestor of all Indo-European languages) now lost in other languages.

Ethnic minorities with schools that offer education in their own languages include Polish, Russian and Belarusian. Another important ethnic minority is the Karaim people, descendants of Karaite Jews thought to have arrived in Lithuania in the late 14th century. The Karaims in Lithuania settled predominantly in Vilnius and Trakai (you can try amazing Karaim food in Trakai!) and retained the use of the own language. The Karaim language is a Turkic language with Hebrew influences and is somewhat related to Crimean Tatar.

How do you say I love you in Lithuanian? 

I love you in Lithuanian: Aš tave myliu

How to say I love you in Lithuanian

How do you say I love you in Lithuania’s minority languages?

I love you in Polish: Kocham cię

I love you in Russian: Ya tebya lyublyu (Я тебя люблю)

I love you in Belarusian: Ya tsyabie kachayu (Я цябе кахаю)

I love you in Karaim: Men seni sevem

 

Luxembourg

Three languages are recognised to be official in Luxembourg, these being French, German and the national language of Luxembourgish. Luxembourgish (Lëtzebuergesch) is a Moselle-Franconian language in the West Germanic group, a group which also includes German and English. Just under 51% of the population of Luxembourg can speak Luxembourgish fluently.

How do you say I love you in Luxembourg? 

I love you in Luxembourgish: Ech hunn dech gär

I love you in French: Je t’aime

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

How to say I love you in Luxembourgish

 

Macedonia (North Macedonia)

Macedonia, officially North Macedonia and previously the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonian, has two official languages. The official languages of Macedonia are Macedonian and Albanian, with around 66% being Macedonian speaking, 25% being Albanian speaking and the remainder being speakers of minority languages.

The minority languages recognised in Macedonia are considered co-official to Macedonian and Albanian in specific municipalities if they are spoken by a minimum of 20% of the population of that municipality. Therefore Turkish is co-official in Centar Župa and Plasnica, Romani in Šuto Orizari, Aromanian in Kruševo (even though it is spoken by only 10% of the municipal population) and Serbian is also co-official in Čučer-Sandevo. Bosnian is also a recognised minority language although it is not co-official within any municipalities.

How do you say I love you in Macedonia? 

I love you in Macedonian: Te sakam (Те сакам)

I love you in Albanian: Të dua

 

How do you say I love you in Macedonia’s minority languages?

I love you in Turkish: Seni seviyorum

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Bosnian: Volim te

I love you in Aromanian: Ti voi

I love you in Serbian: Volim te (Волим те)

 

Malta

Malta’s two official languages are Maltese and English. Maltese is a Semitic language derived from ‘Siculo-Arabic’ (forms of Arabic spoken in Sicily from the 9th century) with vocabulary taken from Sicilian and Italian.

How do you say I love you in Malta? 

I love you in Maltese: Inħobbok

I love you in English: I love you

How to say I love you in Maltese

 

Moldova

Romanian is the native language of 80% of Moldova’s population and is the official language of Moldova. Gagauz, Russian and Ukrainian are also recognised languages at regional levels. Gagauz (a Turkic language related to Azerbaijani, Turkmen, Crimean Tatar and Turkish) is official in the autonomous region of Gagauzia, Ukrainian in the breakaway state of Transnistria and Russian in both Gagauzia and Transnistria.

How do you say I love you in Moldova? 

I love you in Romanian: Te iubesc

 

How do you say I love you in Moldova’s official regional languages?

I love you in Gagauz: Bän seni severim

I love you in Ukrainian: Ya tebe kochayu (Я тебе кохаю)

I love you in Russian: Ya tebya lyublyu (Я тебя люблю)

 

Monaco

The only official language of the principality of Monaco is French. Monégasque is the traditional national language of the Monegasque people (who represent around 21% of the total population, or 6,000 people) and is a dialect of Ligurian.

How do you say I love you in Monaco?

I love you in French: Je t’aime

I love you in Monégasque: Te véuggio bén

 

Montenegro

The official language of Montenegro is Montenegrin, a Serbo-Croat language that is mutually intelligible with Serbian, Croatian and Bosnian. Minority languages in Montenegro include Albanian, Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian.

How do you say I love you in Montenegrin? 

I love you in Montenegrin: Volim te

How do you say I love you in Montenegro’s official minority languages?

I love you in Albanian: Të dua

I love you in Bosnian: Volim te

I love you in Croatian: Volim te

I love you in Serbian: Volim te (Волим те)

 

Netherlands

The official language of the Netherlands is Dutch. The Netherlands also has some minority languages, these being West Frisian (in the province of Friesland), Dutch Low Saxon, and Limburgish.

How do you say I love you in the Netherlands? 

I love you in Dutch: Ik hou van jou

The Bloemenmarkt in Amsterdam is the world's only floating flower market. Buy some seeds or bulbs to take home or, like in this picture, some wooden flowers to keep as a souvenir of the trip.

How do you say I love you in The Netherland’s minority languages?

I love you in West Frisian: Ik hâld fan dy

I love you in Low Saxon: Ik heff di leef

I love you in Limburgish: Ik hald van dich

 

Norway

Norway has two official languages, Norwegian and Sámi. There are two standards/variants of Norwegian that are official, which are Bokmål and Nynorsk. Bokmål (‘book tongue’) is spoken by around 80-90% of Norwegians and is a somewhat Danish influenced form of Norwegian traditionally spoken in the cities. Nynorsk (‘New Norwegian’) is based on rural Norwegian and is used by around 7% of the population. The rest of the population switch between Bokmål and Nynorsk.

Sami is also official in Norway. The most spoken form of Sami in Norway is North Sami (spoken by around 15,000) but there are also speakers of Lule Sami (spoken by around 500 in Norway), Pite Sami (which is nearly extinct) and South Sami (around 300 speakers in Norway).

Minority languages in Europe include Kven (spoken by a Balto-Finnic ethnic minority, this language is closely related to Finnish), Romani, Scandoromani (a Romani dialect indigenous to Norway and Sweden) and Rodi (the language of ethnic Norwegian Travellers – the language is predominantly based on Norwegian with borrowings from Romani and Rotwelsch).

How do you say I love you in Norway? 

I love you in Norwegian (Bokmål): Jeg elsker deg

I love you in Norwegian (Nynorsk): Eg elskar deg

I love you in North Sami: Mun ráhkistan du

I love you in Lule Sami: Mån æhtsáv duv

I love you in Pite Sami: Mån iehtsáv duv

I love you in South Sami: Manne eahtsam datnem

How to say I love you in Norwegian

How do you say I love you in Norway’s minority languages?

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

 

Poland

Poland’s official language is Polish, a West Slavic language in the same subdivision as Czech and Slovak. There are 16 languages that are officially recognised as minority languages.

Languages recognised as minority languages in Poland include Armenian, Belarusian, Czech, German, Yiddish, Hebrew, Lithuanian, Russian, Slovak and Ukrainian. Languages recognised as ethnic minority languages are Karaim, Kashubian, Rusyn, Romani (two forms) and Tatar.

How do you say I love you in Polish? 

I love you in Polish: Kocham cię (pronounced like ‘KOHham chyem’)

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How to say I love you in Polish

How do you say I love you in Poland’s minority languages?

I love you in Armenian: Sirum Em Qez (Սիրում եմ Քեզ)

I love you in Belarusian: Ya tsyabie kachayu (Я цябе кахаю)

I love you in Czech: Miluju tě

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

I love you in Yiddish: Ikh hob dikh lib (איך האָב דיך ליב – reading right to left!)

I love you in Hebrew: Ani ohev otach (אני אוהב אותך) to a woman; Ani ohevet otcha (אני אוהבת אותך) to a man

I love you in Lithuanian: Aš tave myliu

I love you in Russian: Ya tebya lyublyu (Я тебя люблю)

I love you in Slovak: Milujem ťa

I love you in Ukranian: Ya tebe kochayu (Я тебе кохаю)

I love you in Karaim: Men seni sevem

I love you in Kashubian: Kuechum ce

I love you in Rusyn: Lyublyu tya (Люблю тя)

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Tatar: Min sini yaratam

 

Portugal

The only official language in Portugal is Portuguese. Portuguese has many dialects throughout Portugal but only one is recognised as a minority language, this being Mirandese, a dialect of Astur-Leonese spoken in Miranda do Douro in northeastern Portugal.

How do you say I love you in Portugal? 

I love you in Portuguese: Eu amo te / Amo te

 

Romania

Romania’s official language is Romanian, spoken by over 90% of the population. Minority languages include Hungarian, Romani, Ukrainian, German, Russian, Turkish, Tatar, Serbian, Slovak, Bulgarian, and Croatian, some of which are co-official at local or municipal levels.

How do you say I love you in Romania? 

I love you in Romanian: Te iubesc

How to say I love you in Romanian

How do you say I love you in Romania’s minority languages?

I love you in Hungarian: Szeretlek

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Serbian: Volim te (Волим те)

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

I love you in Bulgarian: Obicham te (Обичам те)

I love you in Croatian: Volim te

I love you in Russian: Ya tebya lyublyu (Я тебя люблю)

I love you in Slovak: Milujem ťa

I love you in Ukranian: Ya tebe kochayu (Я тебе кохаю)

I love you in Turkish: Seni seviyorum

I love you in Tatar: Min sini yaratam

 

Russia

Russian is the only official language of Russia, although there are 35 languages that are considered official languages in some of the regions of the country. There are also over 100 minority languages spoken, many of which are endangered or near extinction.

The official regional languages are Abaza (in Karachay-Cherkessia), Adyghe (in Adygea), Altai (in Altai Republic), Bashkir (in Bashkortostan), Buryat (in Buryatia), Chechen (in Chechnya), Chuvash (in Chuvashia), Crimean Tatar (in the annexed Republic of Crimea), Erzya (in Mordovia), Ingush (in Ingushetia), Kabardian (in Kabardino-Balkaria and Karachay-Cherkessia), Kalmyk (in Kalmykia), Karachay-Balkar (in Kabardino-Balkaria and Karachay-Cherkessia), Khakas (in Khakassia), Komi (in the Komi Republic), Hill Mari and Meadow Mari (in Mari El), Moksha (in Mordovia), Nogai (in Karachay-Cherkessia and Dagestan), Ossetian (in North Ossetia–Alania), Tatar (in Tatarstan), Tuvan (in Tuva), Udmurt (in Udmurtia), Ukrainian (in the annexed Republic of Crimea) and Yakut (in the Sakha Republic). Kazakh is also recognised as a minority language in the Altai Republic.

How do you say I love you in Russian? 

I love you in Russian: Ya tebya lyublyu (Я тебя люблю)

How to say I love you in Russian

How do you say I love you in Russia’s official regional languages?

I love you in Adyghe: Sa sh’w wsalhaghw (Сэ шІу усэлъэгъу)

I love you in Altai: Men seni syyp ĵadım (Мен сени сӱӱп jадым)

I love you in Bashkir: Min shinye yaratam (мин һине яратам)

I love you in Buryat: Bi chamd khairtai (Би чамд хайртай)

I love you in Chechen: Suna ẋo duqa veza (Суна хьо дукха веза)

I love you in Chuvash: Epĕ sana juratatăp (Эпĕ сана юрататăп)

I love you in Crimean Tatar: Men seni sevem

I love you in Erzya: Mon tonj večktän (Мон тонь вечктян)

I love you in Kabardian: Fuh wslaghw (фӏы услъагъу)

I love you in Kalmyk: Bi čamd durtav (Би чамд дуртав)

I love you in Karachay-Balkar: Menseni syueme (Mенсени сюеме)

I love you in Komi: Me tznuh radeyta (ме тэнӧ радейта)

I love you in Hill Mari/Meadow Mari: Maay taayaam yuuhratem (Mый тыйым йӧратем)

I love you in Moksha: Keljktä tonj (Келькте тонь)

I love you in Ossetian: Äz dä uarzyn (Æз дæ уарзын)

I love you in Tatar: Min sini yaratam

I love you in Udmurt: Mon-tone-yaratisʹko (Mонтонэяратӥсько)

I love you in Ukranian: Ya tebe kochayu (Я тебе кохаю)

I love you in Yakut (Sakha): Min eyiigin taptwwbwn (Мин эйиигин таптыыбын)

I love you in Kazakh: Men seni jaqsı köremin (literally meaning ‘I see you well’) or Men seni süyemin (Мен сені сүйемін)

 

San Marino

San Marino’s only official language is Italian. The vernacular (spoken) language is the dialect of Romagnol.

How do you say I love you in San Marino? 

I love you in Italian: Ti amo / Ti voglio bene

 

How do you say I love you in Sammarinese/San Marino dialect?

I love you in Sammarinese: A t’ vöi bëin

 

Serbia

Serbia’s official language is Serbian and there are fifteen minority languages in the country, these being Albanian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Bunjevac, Croatian, Czech, German, Hungarian, Macedonian, Romani, Romanian, Rusyn, Slovak, Ukrainian and Vlach.

How do you say I love you in Serbia? 

I love you in Serbian: Volim te (Волим те)

 

How do you say I love you in Serbia’s minority languages?

I love you in Albania: Të dua

I love you in Bosnian: Volim te

I love you in Bulgarian: Obicham te (Обичам те)

I love you in Croatian: Volim te

I love you in Czech: Miluju tě

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

I love you in Hungarian: Szeretlek (pronounced ‘seh-ret-lek’)

I love you in Macedonian: Te sakam (Те сакам)

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Romanian: Te iubesc

I love you in Rusyn: Lyublyu tya (Люблю тя)

I love you in Slovak: Milujem ťa

I love you in Ukrainian: Ya tebe kochayu (Я тебе кохаю)

I love you in Vlach (Aromanian): Ti voi

 

Slovakia

The official language of Slovakia is Slovak (also called Slovakian), a West Slavic language related to Czech. Slovakia also has minority languages with co-official status in certain regions, these being Bulgarian, Czech, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Polish, Romani, Ruthenian (Rusyn) and Ukrainian.

How do you say I love you in Slovakia? 

I love you in Slovak: Milujem ťa

 

How do you say I love you in Slovakia’s minority languages?

I love you in Bulgarian: Obicham te (Обичам те)

I love you in Croatian: Volim te

I love you in Czech: Miluju tě

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

I love you in Hungarian: Szeretlek (pronounced ‘seh-ret-lek’)

I love you in Polish: Kocham cię

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Rusyn: Lyublju tya (Люблю тя)

I love you in Ukrainian: Ya tebe kochayu (Я тебе кохаю)

 

Slovenia

Slovenia’s official language is Slovene, also called Slovenian. Hungarian and Italian are minority languages and are co-official to Slovenian in the Prekmurje region and Slovenian Istria region respectively.

How do you say I love you in Slovenian? 

I love you in Slovene: Ljubim te

How to say I love you in Slovene

How do you say I love you in Slovenia’s minority languages?

I love you in Italian: Ti amo

I love you in Hungarian: Szeretlek (pronounced ‘seh-ret-lek’)

 

Spain

Spain has multiple official languages, although Spanish (Castilian or ‘Castellano’) is the only official language of the entire country. Some languages are official languages of Spain and not simply considered regional, although they are only co-official to Spanish in specific regions. These languages are Catalan (in Catalonia, Valencia and the Balearic Islands), Basque (in Euskadi and Navarre), Galician (in Galicia) and Occitan (in Catalonia).

Other languages are recognised but not official, such as Aragonese (in Aragon), Asturian (in Asturias) and Leonese (in Castile and León). There are some other languages that are not official but are somewhat recognised as unique languages or dialects, these being Fala (a nearly extinct variety similar to Galician), Cantabrian and Extremaduran (Astur-Leonese dialects) and Benasquese (a Ribagorçan dialect spoken in Huesca that is considered a transitional language from Ribagorçan to Catalan, Gascon and Aragonese).

Arabic (particularly Ceuta Darija) and Berber (Riffian Berber) are spoken by the Muslim population of the Spanish autonomous cities of Ceuta and Melilla, some of whom have immigrated to mainland Spain.

Portuguese is also spoken in some areas of Spain, including La Alamedilla in Salamanca province, Cedillo in Cáceres province and the town of Olivenza in the disputed section along the Spain-Portugal border. This section is claimed by Portugal, who do not recognise Spain’s sovereignty over this area due to a broken clause in Article 105 of the 1815 Treaty of Vienna. However, Portuguese has no official status in Spain and is only considered an ‘immigrant’ language.

How do you say I love you in Spanish? 

I love you in Spanish: Te quiero

 

How do you say I love you in Spain’s official regional languages?

I love you in Occitan: T’aimi

I love you in Catalan: T’estimo

I love you in Basque: Maite zaitut

I love you in Galician: Quérote / ámote

How to say I love you in Basque

 

How do you say I love you in Spain’s recognised regional languages?

I love you in Aragonese: T’aimo

I love you in Asturian: Quiérote

I love you in Extremaduran: Te quieru

I love you in Ceuta Darija Arabic: Tanbghik (تنبغيك)

I love you in Riffian Berber: Tekhsekhchek (to a man), Tekhsekhchem (to a woman)

 

Sweden

Sweden’s only official language is Swedish, a North Germanic language that is generally understandable by speakers of Norwegian and Danish. There are also five national minority languages that are recognised by law, these being Finnish, Yiddish, Meänkieli, Romani and Sami.

Meänkieli is a Finnish language that developed in line with standard Finnish until the area east of the Torne River was ceded to Russia in 1809. This meant that the Finnish-speaking area still within Sweden developed isolated from the Finnish-speaking community across the border. Meänkieli can be distinguished from standard Finnish by the lack of developments that occurred in Finnish during the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as having loanwords from both Swedish and Sámi that are commonly used in the vocabulary.

Sámi languages that are spoken in Sweden are Northern Sami, Lule Sami, Ume Sami and Southern Sami.

How do you say I love you in Sweden? 

I love you in Swedish: Jag älskar dig

 

How do you say I love you in Sweden’s minority languages?

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Finnish: Minä rakastan sinua

I love you in Yiddish: Ikh hob dikh lib (איך האָב דיך ליב)

I love you in Northern Sami: Mun ráhkistan du

I love you in Lule Sami: Mån æhtsáv duv

I love you in Ume Sami: Månna ráhkistan du

I love you in Southern Sami: Manne eahtsam datnem

 

Switzerland

Switzerland is the only European country with four official languages. These languages are German (Swiss German, Alemannic dialect), French, Italian and Romansh. Romansh is the only one of the four without equal status at the national level.

German is the most spoken language with 62.6% of the Swiss population natively speaking Swiss German or Standard German at home. 22.9% of the population speak French natively, 8.2% speak Italian natively and only 0.5% speak Romansch as native speakers. Three cantons (Swiss provinces/regions) are officially bilingual and only one is trilingual. The bilingual cantons are Fribourg, Bern and Valais (all have French and German as official languages) and the trilingual canton is Graubünden (with German, Italian and Romansh as the official languages).

There are also a few regional languages in Switzerland without official status and these are Franco-Provençal, Lombard and also Sinte (an Indic language spoken by the Roma of Switzerland).

How do you say I love you in Switzerland? 

I love you in Swiss German: Ich lieb di / Ich ha di lieb

I love you in French: Je t’aime

I love you in Italian: Ti amo

I love you in Romansh: Jau hai tai gument / Jeu carezel tei

 

Turkey

Turkey’s only official language is Turkish. Minority languages somewhat recognised by Turkey are Kurmanji, Arabic, Zazaki, Pomak Bulgarian, Gagauz and Laz. However, minority language rights are restricted in Turkey due to Article 42 of the constitution and the government’s current view on minority ethnic groups’ use of their mother language.

How do you say I love you in Turkey? 

I love you in Turkish: Seni seviyorum

How to say I love you in Turkish

How do you say I love you in Turkey’s minority languages? 

I love you in Arabic: Bhebbek (بحبك)

I love you in Bulgarian: Obicham te (Обичам те)

I love you in Kurmanji/Kurdish: Dilê min ketiye te

I love you in Gagauz: Bän seni severim

I love you in Laz: Ma si kqorop (მა სი ქყოროფ)

I love you in Zazaki: Ez to ra hes kena

 

Ukraine

The official language of Ukraine is Ukrainian, although Russian is the native language of 29.6% of the population. The constitution protects both Ukrainian and Russian, as well as any minority languages, in their use and ‘free development’.

Ukraine recognised four indigenous languages, these being Crimean Tatar, Krymchak (a Judeo-Tatar language), Karaim and Urum. National minority languages are Belarusian, Bulgarian, Gagauz, German, Greek, Hungarian, Yiddish, Polish, Romanian, Slovak, Rusyn, Czech, Romani, Serbian, Bashkort (Bashkir) and Armenian.

How do you say I love you in Ukrainian? 

I love you in Ukrainian: Ya tebe kochayu (Я тебе кохаю)

I love you in Russian: Ya tebya lyublyu (Я тебя люблю) *

*official in the annexed parts of Ukraine such as the Republic of Crimea.

 

How do you say I love you in Ukraine’s minority languages? 

I love you in Belarusian: Ya tsyabie kachayu (Я цябе кахаю)

I love you in Bulgarian: Obicham te (Обичам те)

I love you in Gagauz: Bän seni severim

I love you in Greek: S’agapo (Σ΄αγαπώ)

I love you in Karaim: Men seni sevem

I love you in Crimean Tatar: Men seni sevem

I love you in Hungarian: Szeretlek

I love you in Yiddish: Ikh hob dikh lib (איך האָב דיך ליב)

I love you in Polish: Kocham cię

I love you in Romanian: Te iubesc

I love you in Slovak: Milujem ťa

I love you in Rusyn: Lyublyu tya (Люблю тя)

I love you in German: Ich liebe dich

I love you in Czech: Miluju tě

I love you in Romani: Me mangav tut

I love you in Serbian: Volim te (Волим те)

I love you in Armenian: Sirum Em Qez (Սիրում եմ Քեզ)

I love you in Bashkir: Min һinye yaratam (мин һине яратам)

 

United Kingdom

The de facto official language of the United Kingdom is English, although the UK has 14 indigenous languages (including three sign languages). Of the regional languages, one is considered a regional historical language (Cornish) as the last native speaker died in 1777. However, Cornish has had a revival since 1903 and is protected as a historical minority language.

The other indigenous languages of the United Kingdom are Scots, Welsh, Ulster-Scots, Scottish Gaelic, Irish as well as Angloromani (spoken by the English, Welsh and Scottish Traveller communities) and Shelta (a secret language spoken by the Irish Traveller community).

So, what’s the difference between Scots, Ulster-Scots and Scottish Gaelic? Scots, which is spoken in the Scottish Lowlands as well as on Orkney and Shetland, and Ulster-Scots are very similar and are West Germanic languages. Ulster-Scots is often considered a dialect of Scots that is spoken in Northern Ireland. Scottish Gaelic, however, is a Celtic language that is similar to Irish and Manx.

Around 1.2 million people in Scotland consider themselves able to speak, read and write Scots (24% of the population). Ulster-Scots is spoken by around 2% of the population of Northern Ireland (around 30,000 people) although only 0.9% said they could speak, read and write the language.

Irish Gaelic is also spoken in Northern Ireland with 104,943 people (6%) being able to speak the language and 4,130 people (0.2%) using it as their main language at home.

Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) was once the main language of almost all of Scotland. Today it is only spoken by around 1.1% of Scotland’s population and is considered a threatened language. The Outer Hebrides (Lewis and Harris, North Uist, Benbecula, South Uist, and Barra) is where you’ll find the highest concentration of Scottish Gaelic speakers with 52.2% of the population being bilingual in Gaelic and English. The Inner Hebrides is also home to many Gaelic speaking people, with 29.4% of the population of the Isle of Skye speaking Gaelic.

Welsh is the de jure language of Wales, the only language that is de jure official in the entire United Kingdom. The language is spoken by around 29% of people in Wales and speakers are more concentrated in the north and the west of Wales. The county of Gwynedd has the highest percentage of Welsh speakers (64%) and is followed by Anglesey (56%). Gwynedd is also the main country with people who consider Welsh their first language – some children speak very little English until they learn it at school. 13.4% of the population in Wales considers themselves fluent in the Welsh language.

How do you say I love you in the United Kingdom? 

I love you in English: I love you (shocking, I know)

I love you in Scots: A loue ye

I love you in Scottish Gaelic: Tha gaol agam ort (pronounced like ‘hah ga-uhl ahkuhm oorst’)

I love you in Irish: Mo ghrá thú (literally ‘you are my love’, pronounced ‘mu grah hoo’) / Is tú mo ghrá (pronounced ‘iss too mu graw’)

I love you in Welsh: Fi’n caru ti (in the South), Dwi’n dy garu di (in the North)

I love you in Cornish: My a’th kar

I love you in Shelta: Gra a mo gris (meaning ‘love of my heart’)

How to say I love you in Welsh

 

United Kingdom – British Crown Dependencies

The UK also has British Crown Dependencies, three island territories off the coast of Great Britain that are self-governing. These three territories are the Isle of Man, the Bailiwick of Guernsey (which includes the islands of Guernsey, Alderney and Sark) and the Bailiwick of Jersey.

The official language of all three territories is English, but all three have their own indigenous regional languages. The Isle of Man’s regional language is Manx, a Gaelic language related to Scottish and Irish Gaelic. Manx is considered a critically endangered language (and, in fact, did go extinct when the last native speaker died in 1974) but has been subject to many revival efforts since then and now 1,800 people are considered to be conversationally fluent in the Manx language.

Both Guernsey and Jersey have indigenous regional languages which are forms of Norman, the French spoken in the Normandy region of France. However, the Norman languages spoken in Guernsey and Jersey developed separately (although not isolated) from the Norman-French language and have influences from both Old Norse and English.

Guernsey’s indigenous language is called Guernésiais (pronounced ‘jerr-nehz-yey’) and Jersey’s is called Jèrriais. Sercquiais is the form of Norman-French spoken on the island of Sark, which is a descendant of Jèrriais with influence from Guernésiais. However, very little Sercquiais has ever been written down and there are now less than 20 native speakers. Auregnais was the form of Norman-French spoken on the island of Alderney and was closely related to Sercquiais. Sadly, Auregnais became extinct in the 1960s.

How do you say I love you in the Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey? 

I love you in English: I love you

I love you in Manx: Ta graih aym ort

I love you in Jèrriais: J’t’aime

I love you in Guernésiais: J’t’oïme

How to say I love you in Manx

Vatican City

The Vatican City is the only country on this entire list that doesn’t actually have an official language! However, two languages are used for important and legal documents in the city-state. The Holy See, which includes the territory of the Vatican City as well as some areas around Rome, uses Latin as the official language and all official documents are in Latin. The Vatican City (which is separate from the Holy See in administrative matters) uses Italian for legal and official documents. Yep, it’s not confusing at all.

How do you say I love you in Vatican City? 

I love you in Latin: Te amo

I love you in Italian: Ti amo

 

And PHEW! There you have it, a massive list of how to say ‘I love you’ in European languages. Yep, every official and minority language in the continent of Europe (that I could actually find). I hope you enjoy learning how to say I love you in 50+ languages and maybe you’ll end up saying one to your sweetheart.

What languages do you speak? How do you say ‘I love you’ in them? 

Want to know how to say I love you in every language in Europe? Learn I love you in different languages and surprise the one you love.

How to say I love you in different languages! This guide will teach you how to say I love you in every language in Europe. Choose your language of love and happy Valentine's day!

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Comments:

  • February 14, 2020

    Omg I love this idea!!! I have a note on the Polish pronunciation. The letter ę is phonemically pronounced as a nasal, however nowadays, when in the final position, most people drop the nasality and it becomes the same as a normal e. So cię is pronounced like “chye.” Super cool article! I never knew a lot of these!

    reply...
  • Rhonda Albom

    February 15, 2020

    What a fun post. It must have taken so long to pull it together, but it sure is unique. I only knew two of them (aside from English) before I read this.

    reply...

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